Monthly Archives: January, 2016

E-Headlines Ski
0

Just three hours from Bend, sporting great terrain and affordability, Warner Canyon Ski Area is a great family friendly weekend getaway. Plus, supporting community and club ski resorts around the region after a multi-year drought is important to the success of the entire Oregon winter industry. Showcasing about 800 vertical and 200 acres accessible from a three-seater lift with a mid-mountain get-off, Warner is impressive for a community non-profit. With 22 runs to choose from there are equal number advanced and intermediate/beginner lines and the longest trail measures 1.1 miles. There is a black diamond run called Coyote to the skiers’ left, which takes riders on a steep drop into the trees where any number of untracked paths can be explored. To skiers’ far far right, there are many aches of un-groomed gullies, kicker rocks and other such playful features to jib. Overall, Warner provides a great balance of traditional resort corduroy and lift accessible side country ambiance. Warner is located 11 miles, about 15 minutes drive, from the town of Lakeview where there are plenty of options for accommodation. Budget options include the cozy Stevens two bedroom Lakeview Cottage which can be reserved at 541-382-1872 or Hunters Hot Springs, 541-947-4242. The operators at Warner Canyon say they can provide an excellent shred fest at a fraction of the cost with none of the lines or crowds. For more information on cost, terrain, and cross country, backcountry, and snowmobile trails see, http://warnercanyon.org or call 541-947-5001.

E-Headlines pup crawl
0

Have a howling good time at a local brew pub during the Pup Crawl and help raise money for homeless animals. Join us for the Humane Society of Central Oregon’s 5th Annual Pup Crawl on February 2, 4, 5, 9, 11, 12, 16, 18 and 19 from 4-7pm each night. Join us at any or all of the nights at eight great brewpubs. Tuesday, February 2 at 10 Barrel Brewing Company (1135 NW Galveston, Bend 97701) Thursday, February 4 at Deschutes Brewery (1044 NW Bond, Bend 97701) Friday, February 5 at Wild Ride Brew Company (332 SW 5th, Redmond 97756) Tuesday, February 9 at Worthy Brewing (495 NE Bellevue, Bend 97701) Thursday, February 11 at GoodLife Brewing Company (70 SW Century, Bend 97701) Friday, February 12 at Riverbend Brewing Company (2650 NW Division St, Bend 97701)   Tuesday February 16 at Crux Fermentation Project (50 SW Division St, Bend 97702) Thursday February 18 at Craft Kitchen & Brewery (803 SW Industrial Way, Bend, OR) Thursday February 18 at Atlas Cider (550 SW Industrial Way, Bend, OR) Friday February 19 at Cascade Lakes Brewing Co. Lodge (1441 SW Chandler, Bend 97702) …

E-Headlines osu
0

(Rendering courtesy of OSU-Cascades) Oregon State University – Cascades announced it will proceed with the purchase of 46 acres of property in Bend that adjoins the university’s new campus currently under construction. The announcement was made at a meeting of OSU-Cascades’ board of advisors. “The potential addition of this property has been considered and discussed publicly for some time,” said Becky Johnson, OSU-Cascades vice president. “This purchase demonstrates Oregon State’s commitment to fully bring higher education to Central Oregon and serve 3,000 to 5,000 students by 2025.” The property being purchased is located along SW Chandler Avenue and is the location of a pumice mine. The purchase follows the completion of a due diligence period that included title, environmental, geotechnical and engineering reviews. Additional evaluations included a space analysis, land use review and initial design conceptualizations. The property sits adjacent to OSU-Cascades’ campus, a 10-acre site now under construction that will open in September and can serve up to 1,890 students, faculty and staff. “Expanding our campus onto this property also supports Oregon’s land use goals of increasing density rather than sprawl,” said Johnson.  “This type of development will promote alternative transportation modes, and we are committed to extending transit to other Central Oregon communities so that they can easily access the new campus.” Kelly Sparks, associate vice president for finance and strategic planning at OSU-Cascades, said the topography of the former pumice mine provides innovative design opportunities. She said the university will evaluate proposals from design and engineering firms to create a long range development plan for the expanded campus. Purchase of the pumice mine property was approved by the former State Board of Higher Education in 2013. The property will be purchased for $7,963,000. In addition, Oregon State will pay $11,931 in closing costs and $131,500 in fees for security services and for extending the due diligence period. Meanwhile, an expanded community engagement and campus planning process involving 80 community members has been underway since November. That process is exploring considerations for the new campus including sustainability, health and wellness, community integration, and arts, culture, and enrichment. The university planning process also will consider the option of OSU-Cascades adding a nearby 76-acre Deschutes County landfill to the campus footprint.  A non-binding Letter of Intent between Deschutes County and OSU-Cascades provides for a two-year a framework for exploring the viability of reclaiming the former demolition landfill as part of the OSU-Cascades campus.…

E-Headlines saving
0

Oregon College Savings Plan sees record contributions in 2015; urges families to save now while taking advantage of tax deductions The Oregon College Savings Plan saw record contributions and assets in 2015, bolstering the fact that Oregon families are embracing the concept of saving for college early to eliminate future debt. The Oregon College Savings Plan, which launched in January 2001, grew to more than $1.2 billion in assets as of December 31, 2015, with more than $171 million in contributions made to accounts last year. The Plan currently has more than 86,000 accounts. “These numbers are encouraging, as they indicate families are getting the message that saving early and often is the best way to avoid college debt in the future,” explained Michael Parker, executive director of the Oregon College Savings Plan.” According to Debt.org, American students now owe $1.2 trillion in student loans; our mission is to educate families realize that it’s better to save now than borrow later.” The Oregon College Savings Plan also offers tax advantages. Although contributions are after-tax, any investment earnings are federal and state income tax free when withdrawals are used for qualified expenses. In addition, Oregon offers a 2015 state income tax deduction on contributions of up to $4,600 for married couples and $2,300 for single filers. (Recapture provisions apply. Refer to the Disclosure Booklet and consult your tax advisor.) Oregon taxpayers have until April 18, 2016 to receive the deduction. The Oregon College Savings Plan is currently hosting a number of free college funding seminars across the state where 529 plan specialists will be on hand to answer questions and discuss federal and state financial aid options and how to apply for scholarship funds. To find a seminar, visit www.OregonCollegeSavings.com/buzz/seminar.shtml. About The Oregon College Savings Plan The Oregon College Savings Plan, which is part of the Oregon 529 College Savings Network, launched in January 2001 and has grown to more than $1.2 billion in assets as of December 31, 2015. The plan is managed by TIAA‐CREF Tuition Financing, Inc. For more information about the Oregon College Savings Plan, its investment options and how to enroll, visit www.OregonCollegeSavings.com or call toll free 866‐772‐8464. Follow the Oregon College Savings Plan on Facebook.com/oregoncollegesavings and Twitter.com/OregonCSP; all social media platforms are managed by the state of Oregon.

E-Headlines Money
0

On the sixth anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Citizen’s United decision, OSPIRG Foundation released a report highlighting the sizable disparity between large donors and small donors in Oregon’s elections. The report finds that in the 2014 election season, just over a thousand large donors contributed nearly ten times more than all small donors combined–a group comprised of at least 50,000 Oregonians. “In school we are taught that every person has one voice and one vote, but when large donors are able to amplify their opinions through their donations, their voices threaten to drown out the rest of us. Today, the size of your wallet too often determines the volume of your voice, and it’s undermining the health of our democracy”, said David Rosenfeld, executive director of OSPIRG Foundation and author of Oregon’s Multi-Million Dollar Democracy. Among the report’s findings: Between 46,000 and 91,000 donors contributed $100 or less to Oregon candidates and ballot initiatives in 2014, totaling $6.5 million. In contrast, the approximately 1,000 donors that gave $5,000 or more contributed over $64 million, or nearly ten times as much as all small donors combined. Out-of-state donors comprised only about a third of this group of donors, but over two-thirds of the giving ($44M). On average, each of these top donors gave more than 500 times that that of one $100 donor. “OSPIRG Foundation’s report demonstrates how the average Oregonian’s voice is being drowned out in our political system by wealthy donors. It’s time to level the playing field and ensure that everyone has an equal voice in our political process,” said Kitty Piercy, Mayor of Eugene. The OSPIRG Foundation report calls for, among other reforms, efforts to amplify the voices of small donors through the following: Match small contributions with public funds. The country’s largest city – New York – has seen encouraging success with such a program since the 1980s, which matches the first $175 of donations from city residents at a six-to-one ratio. After the 2013 general election, the winners of 54 out of the 59 open elected positions participated in the program, with 61% of all funds raised coming from small donors, costing just 0.06% of the city’s 2013 budget. Small donor vouchers. Seattle voters just approved a new program to boost the power of small donors by distributing four $25 vouchers to every voter in the city, which voters can choose to contribute to the city candidate(s) of their choosing. Enhance Oregon’s political tax credit. Oregon’s political tax credit already allows taxpayers to receive up to a $50 tax credit per year ($100 per household) for political contributions. Streamlining the program so that taxpayers could expedite their tax credit could increase the participation of small donors. “By amplifying the power of small donors, and empowering candidates who would prefer to raise money from ordinary people rather than wealthy interests, we can help restore a democracy by and for the people,” said Kate Titus, executive director of Common Cause. With public debate around important issues often dominated by special interests pursing their own narrow agendas, OSPIRG Foundation offers an independent voice that works on behalf of the public interest. OSPURG Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization, works to protect consumers and promote good government. We investigate problems, craft solutions, educate the public, and offer meaningful opportunities for civic participation. Maddie Kusch-Kavanagh, Campaign Organizer, 513-254-3656, madeline@ospirg.org

E-Headlines Oregon
0

House Republicans have outlined an agenda for the 2016 Legislative Session that they say will put more dollars in the pockets of working families, strengthen and encourage family choices in Oregon’s education system, increase oversight and transparency in state government, reduce red tape for small businesses and entrepreneurs, and provide a mechanism for clear and consistent measurements of carbon emissions. In announcing the agenda, House Republicans made a commitment to Oregonians to pursue policies that will strengthen and grow the middle class and put Oregon back on the path to prosperity. “House Republicans believe every Oregonian deserves an equal opportunity at success,” said House Republican Leader Mike McLane (R-Powell Butte). “The agenda we’ve created will ease financial burdens on working Oregonians, help them achieve their educational and professional goals, and ensure that their state government operates in a more transparent and accountable manner. I look forward to these bills receiving hearings and passing the Legislature to help Oregon’s working families.” Providing Tax Relief For Working Families Allow low- and middle-income Oregonians to keep more of the money they earn by reducing and modernizing Oregon’s lowest and middle income tax rates, some of the highest in the nation. Increase the Earned Income Tax Credit, putting more dollars in the pockets of working families by encouraging and rewarding their hard work. Strengthening & Encouraging Family Choices In Our Education System Eliminate the sunset on Oregon’s open enrollment law so that parents have the opportunity to enroll their children at schools tailored to their specific needs. Establish the Student Loan Interest Tax Credit so that more Oregonians can afford higher education and reduce their financial burdens post-college. Invest in our best and brightest educators by implementing a merit pay system that rewards teachers for their successes in the classroom. Promoting Good Government, Transparency & Accountability Reign in government bureaucracy by increasing legislative oversight of the agency rulemaking process. Promote transparency in government by requiring agency division directors and employees who report directly to an agency director to follow conflict of interest disclosure requirements. Authorize the Legislature to, when necessary, appoint independent counsel to conduct investigations of Executive Branch misconduct. Cutting Red Tape For Small Businesses & Entrepreneurs…

E-Headlines homeless
0

For the eleventh straight year, the Central Oregon Homeless Leadership Coalition is conducting a one-day count of people who are struggling with homelessness. The count is part of a national effort to identify the number of people struggling to find appropriate and adequate housing. This year’s count will be a departure from past year’s efforts. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires communities to count people living in shelters or supportive programs on even number years and conduct a more comprehensive count of the broader homeless population on odd number years. “Since this annual effort began more than ten years ago, our Central Oregon community has elected to go above and beyond the basic requirements on those alternating years. We have made the extra effort each year to conduct surveys with individuals that are living in shelters, as well as individuals camping out, living on the streets and doubled-up with other families,” explained Bob Moore with the Homeless Leadership Coalition. “A decision was made to bring our local efforts in line with the same process the rest of Oregon and the nation is using,” explained Don Senecal, co-chair of the Homeless Leadership Coalition. “This year we will only be counting people in shelters or supportive housing programs. Next year we will be conducting a more comprehensive count of the broader homeless population in Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson Counties and the Confederates Tribes of Warm Springs.” As a result, this year there will be no ‘street count’ that identifies people living in weekly motels, ‘doubled-up’ with other families, camping, sleeping in cars, or in other places not designed for long-term habitation. This year’s count will be conducted by agencies that provide shelter beds and transitional housing. Those services are primarily available in Bend, Redmond, Prineville and Madras. On Thursday, January 28, staff will be conducting confidential surveys for people living in those facilities. The information collected as a part of that effort will allow local agencies and programs to qualify for funding, better target support services, and develop plans to address poverty and homelessness in Central Oregon. Bob Moore 541-815-3113 or bob_moore1@msn.com

E-Headlines HHRP
0

(Photo | Courtesy of HARPER HOUF PETERSON RIGHELLIS INC.) As much as we all would like to think that the current craze of creating sustainable natural  landscapes is a  new idea, the reality is – it is not.    While the Genesis of the concept dates much further back in history,  as recently as 1969, a landscape architect named Ian McHarg published Design with Nature,  a step-by-step instruction manual on land development stressing how to utilize natural land processes in the pursuit of designing ‘with’ the land rather than ‘on’ the land. Short answer  – designers need to recognize the intrinsic patterns and physical characteristics of the unbuilt environment . On a smaller scale, McHarg was also interested in garden design and believed that homes should be planned and designed with private garden spaces promoting an ecological view.  This requires the designer to become more familiar with the project site by understanding its’ soil, plants, solar orientation and, drainage. McHarg’s book was the first work of its kind ‘to define the problems of modern development and present a process prescribing compatible solutions.’  (Frederick Steiner)    Soap box aside, this very simple tenet is the basis of all good land design. Closer to home, good design coupled with sustainable practices can also save you money.  According to the EPA, 30 – 60 percent of urban area fresh water is used for landscape irrigation purposes and sadly, this problem is often exacerbated by poor landscape and irrigation design. So, what should we do?…

E-Headlines Moneytree
0

With more than 30 years of experience in nonprofit fundraising, Bill Kemp is one of Central Oregon’s most experienced and successful executives. The public is invited to attend a workshop with Kemp on February 4 at the Downtown Bend Library. During the workshop participants will learn about nonprofit fundraising planning and begin developing a comprehensive fundraising strategy. Kemp will provide tips and tricks for avoiding common pitfalls along the way. The workshop begins at 11am and is free and open to the public. “Having a plan is critical,” says Kemp. “No fundraising gets done without a plan.” Kemp says there is a lot of support for nonprofits in Central Oregon. “Individual donors contribute 75 percent of all dollars donated to nonprofits. Having a consistent and systematic approach to keeping donors and reaching out to new donors is important,” he says. A solid fundraising plan is made up of many components and Kemp says that if they all aren’t are working together, fundraising goals and the financial sustainability of an organization is at risk. During his fundraising career, Kemp has helped to generate more than $35 million in contributions to nine organizations in five states. Locally, he has been heavily involved with both Neighbor Impact and Volunteers in Medicine growing both organizations donor bases and increasing donations. Prior to arriving in Central Oregon, Kemp directed the Oahu YMCA’s $10 million capital campaign.  Kemp is also a fundraising instructor at COCC. For more information about this or other library programs, please visit the library website at www.deschuteslibrary.org. People with disabilities needing accommodations (alternative formats, seating or auxiliary aides) should contact Liz at 312-1032.

E-Headlines Team Of Business People Working Together On A Laptop
0

Avoid time consuming and costly mistakes by learning from someone who’s “been there, done that.”  Continuing February 2, SCORE business counselors will be available every Tuesday from 5:30 – 7:30pm for free one-on one small business counseling in the Second Floor Tutor Room of the Downtown Bend Library. Individuals who operate or wish to start small businesses can discuss business planning, organization and start-up, finance, marketing and other critical business issues with SCORE volunteers in private, confidential sessions.   No appointment necessary. SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to educating entrepreneurs and helping small businesses start, grow, and succeed nationwide. They are a resource partner with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and have been mentoring small business owners for more than forty years.  For more information about Central Oregon SCORE please visit their web site at www.scorecentraloregon.org. Session Dates: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 Tuesday, February 9, 2016 Tuesday, February 16, 2016 Tuesday, February 23, 2016 The Deschutes Public Library, located in the high desert of Central Oregon serves more than 150,000 Deschutes County residents through libraries in Downtown Bend, East Bend, La Pine, Redmond, Sisters, and Sunriver.  The Library’s website provides access to hundreds of resources, magazine articles, downloadable books, from the comfort of home and work.  The Library offers free and dynamic cultural programming for all ages to enrich our daily experience and encourage all residents to Know More. …

1 2 3 12