Monthly Archives: January, 2016

E-Headlines tax
0

Saturday, January 23 at King Elementary School in Northeast Portland supporters gathered for the winter kick-off for A Better Oregon. The A Better Oregon campaign is slated to address what they call, “the long-standing need for game-changing investments in Oregon’s schools and community services by holding large and out-of-state corporations accountable for their fair share in taxes.” Since October, A Better Oregon has been circulating a petition for Initiative Petition 28, a ballot measure that would increase the corporate minimum tax for C corporations whose Oregon sales exceed $25 million each year. “As this campaign progresses you’ll see tens of thousands of educators come together to stand up for their students. That’s because we know, first-hand, the impact disinvestment in public education has on their learning,” said Hanna Vaandering, an elementary physical education teacher from Beaverton, and President of the Oregon Education Association. “If we want stronger communities, more options for our students, a better future for all Oregonians, then there is no way around it — large, out-of-state corporations are going to have to start paying their fair-share, just as everyday Oregonians have done all along.” “I keep hearing that things are going to get better. Instead, they keep getting worse. School years and school days are still short. Class sizes are getting bigger. Our graduation rate is one of the worst in the country. And it’s not just our schools — everywhere you turn, there’s need. And now is the time to fix it,” said Collin Robinson, parent of two from Bend and elected president of Oregon Parent Teachers Association. Opponents of Initiative Petition 28 (IP28) state that it is a costly and damaging proposal. The Bend Chamber has joined a coalition of small businesses, local chambers and consumers from across Oregon in opposing IP28. The nonpartisan Legislative Revenue Office has estimated that IP28 would increase taxes on Oregon sales by more than $5 billion per two-year budget cycle – by far the largest tax increase in our state’s history. The Bend Chamber has posted on its website several reasons the initiative would be so damaging: Because IP28 would be a tax on gross sales – not profits – businesses would be required to pay the tax regardless of whether they’re making a profit or not. That would force many employers to raise prices or cut jobs in order to stay in business. IP28 would impose billions in new taxes on the sales of products and services that Oregonians buy and use every day – food, electricity, insurance, health care, medicine, gasoline and other essentials. That would especially hurt small businesses and families on fixed incomes. IP28 is like a hidden sales tax, except worse, because it would be applied at multiple stages of the supply chain. By the time a product goes from the manufacturer to distributor to retailer and ultimately reaches the consumer, it may have been taxed multiple times. This “tax on a tax” would make Oregon products more expensive, and Oregon companies less competitive. Ultimately the costs of this huge new tax increase, if passed, will fall on Oregon small and medium-sized businesses, as well as Oregon consumers and families, in the form of higher prices for almost everything we buy. Finally, there’s no guarantee that the billions in new taxes from IP28 would go where proponents claim they would.  In fact, there is no plan and no accountability for how this huge new tax increase would be used — it’s a blank check for politicians to spend as they please for years to come. As part of the A Better Oregon campaign’s effort to collect the 88,184 signatures needed to qualify for the November 2016 ballot, volunteers circulated petitions throughout the day. Organizers planned to gather 1,000 signatures in the one-day event. Signatures are due to the Secretary of State July 8, 2016. “I care about my community and I want to make sure it’s healthy, but as a small business owner, there’s only so much I can do on my own. Crowded classrooms, unaffordable health care, seniors retiring into poverty… everyone can agree that these things need to change. With A Better Oregon, we have the opportunity to do just that — we can make the kinds of investments that will allow our communities to thrive,” said Carmen Ripley Wilson, owner of Beanstalk Children’s Resale in Portland.…

E-Headlines School
0

Investigations of alleged educator misconduct averaged more than 14 months in 2015 The Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) needs to improve its work environment and increase accountability to address substantial delays in its core services for teachers and other educators, according to a new audit released by Secretary of State Jeanne P. Atkins. The audit was prepared in response to House Bill 3339 from the 2015 Legislative Session. TSPC, an independent agency governed by a 17-member commission, licenses about 19,000 Oregon educators a year, approves educator preparation programs at Oregon colleges, and investigates about 300 complaints against educators annually. “TSPC is a small agency, but it plays a crucial role in Oregon’s K-12 education system,” said Atkins. “Our auditors found that TSPC lacks clear expectations and accountability for its performance at all levels. The Commissioners, management and staff all need to work together to improve performance.” The agency has made recent improvements, but still faces substantial backlogs in teacher licensing and investigations that have persisted for years. Applicants who filed for licenses in July 2015 faced a four-month wait. Investigations of alleged educator misconduct averaged more than 14 months in 2015, weakening evidence and reducing investigative depth. Response times to emails from educators have improved, but still average more than a week. The agency has just 26 employees, and cuts to management and staff during the recession contributed to the problems. A complicated, paper-based licensing system also contributed, as did an inadequate agency web site that does not provide answers to basic licensing questions. Evaluations are sporadic, including the Commission’s evaluation of the executive director. Performance tracking is limited, and management’s focus on work process improvement is minimal. Tensions between management and staff have also been substantial, affecting agency performance. “The agency has to improve communication, develop performance standards, and provide timely feedback on employee progress,” said Atkins. “These are basic building blocks for a successful organization. I encourage the Legislature to review this audit closely and work with the agency on follow-up, including continuing evaluation of the resources needed to get this job done.” In 2015, the Oregon Legislature approved license fee increases – the first in 10 years. The increase allowed TSPC to hire more staff and helped the agency replace the outdated licensing system, so applicants can file applications and pay online. The Commission also finished a three-year process of simplifying license requirements. TSPC’s more stable financial footing and improved staffing should allow it to focus on building a more productive workplace, one of its most significant tasks going forward, the auditors concluded.

E-Headlines 1000 NW Wall, Bend, Oregon
0

The New Year is upon us and it is a time for many retailers to take stock of their business and begin to put the pieces in place for a successful 2016. Smaller specialty retailers often bemoan their behemoth counterparts for their discounting strategy but there are ways they can combat the large format competition. Simply stated. Go where they go and then, go where they can’t. Technology The big boys, such as Macy’s, REI, Target and Best Buy are leading the way on omnichannel retailing. Omni channel retailing allows customers to shop across multiple platforms and devices.  This trend will  gather steam in 2016 and will likely be the expected norm in the near future.  Smaller retailers don’t need a mammoth sized budget to compete here but they do need the right POS (point of sale) and inventory management system to be able to implement a more seamless shopping experience and gather customer data. This expense will pay dividends when coupled with clear and measurable goals focused on improving your customers shopping experience. Think about all of the ways people want to shop today and build your stores strategy accordingly. You can easily blur the lines between online and offline shopping by bringing technology into your store. Consider arming your sales associates with tablets to control the online presentation of your products, order on the spot and have items shipped directly to their home. Conversely, by allowing your customers to shop on the web and pick up their purchase in the store you add layers and flexibility to the shopping experience. Data does not lie and by creating more sophisticated customer profiles you can do many things from creating more personal marketing messages to allowing customers to track purchase history regardless of whether they purchased on the web or in the store. Each of these concepts is being practiced by large retailers and will become the expected norm for all retailers in short order. Community While capitalizing on technology to create a more cohesive shopping experience mimics what the big boxes are doing, smaller retailers will also want to cement the cornerstone of what truly makes them special (and an area that large format stores struggle with), building local community.   Take your store’s brand promise and make it come alive through local events and locally focused social responsibility programs.  For example, a running shop might host a guest speaker to talk about the biomechanics of running as a way to avoid injury and run longer with less stress to the body.  A clothing boutique could host a fundraiser for a local charity focused on empowering women and girls.  Neither of these examples necessarily has a sales promotion linked directly to them but instead bring together and speak directly to their target audience. Creating community solidifies your store’s place in the local market, creates brand ambassadors and allows you to soften the “Always low prices … Always” mentality that many consumers live by.  0While customers do look for the lowest price as the number one trigger for a purchase, there are individual strategies that incorporate technology, data, events and social responsibility that, when combined with proper planning and execution, can vault your retail brand beyond the big box competition.  Make a list of strategies you will implement in the coming year, set your priorities and begin to knock them down.  A year from now, you will be glad you did. ____________________________________________________________________________ Jim Miller owns Retail Revision which uses a unique approach to help business identify their goals, create a strategy and execute key initiatives. Retail Revision works with both manufacturers and retailers to implement change and help create growth. A unique consumer-centric retail perspective and a passion for delivering results to their clients’ bottom line set them apart. Jim Miller jim@retailrevision.com www.retailrevision.com…

1 2 3 4 5 12